Literary analysis of the poem the road not taken by walt whitman

The crowd followed the two-mile procession to Harleigh Cemetery where a service was held and Whitman was buried. Despite the fact that Camden saw his final years of life and his burial, Whitman was by birth and soul a New Yorker.

Literary analysis of the poem the road not taken by walt whitman

This is how God addresses Ezekiel, and the use of it in the poem elevates Eliot to a god-like position, and reduces the reader to nothing more than a follower; this could also have been put in as a response to the vast advancements of the time, where science made great leaps of technology, however the spiritual and cultural sectors of the world lay forgotten, according to Eliot.

Eliot himself noted that this is from Ecclesiastes 12, a book within the Bible that discuss the meaning of life, and the borne duty of man to appreciate his life. The references to shadows seems to imply that there is something larger and far more greater than the reader skulking along beside the poem, lending it an air of menace and the narrator an air of omnipotence, of being everywhere at once.

The German in the middle is from Tristan and Isolde, and it concerns the nature of love — love, like life, is something given by God, and humankind should appreciate it because it so very easily disappears.

In Tristan and Isolde, the main idea behind the opera is that while death conquers all and unites grieving lovers, love itself only causes problems in the first place, and therefore it is death that should be celebrated, and not love.

Hyacinth was a young Spartan prince who caught the eye of Apollo, and in a tragic accident, Appollo killed him with his discus. Mourning his lover, Apollo turned the drops of blood into flowers, and thus was born the flower Hyacinth.

Literary analysis of the poem the road not taken by walt whitman

There are twofold reasons for the reference to Hyacinth: However, to continue with the same theme in the poem, the evidence of love will be lost to death, and there will be nothing more existing.

Madame Sosostris, famous clairvoyante, Had a bad cold, nevertheless Is known to be the wisest woman in Europe, With a wicked pack of cards. Here, said she, Is your card, the drowned Phoenician Sailor, Those are pearls that were his eyes. Here is Belladonna, the Lady of the Rocks, The lady of situations.

Here is the man with three staves, and here the Wheel, And here is the one-eyed merchant, and this card, Which is blank, is something he carries on his back, Which I am forbidden to see. I do not find The Hanged Man. Fear death by water.

I see crowds of people, walking round in a ring. If you see dear Mrs. Equitone, Tell her I bring the horoscope myself: One must be so careful these days. On the surface of the poem the poet reproduces the patter of the charlatan, Madame Sosostris, and there is the surface irony: But each of the details justified realistically in the palaver of the fortune-teller assumes a new meaning in the general context of the poem.

The surface irony is thus reversed and becomes an irony on a deeper level.

Bertram Rota Booksellers - Advanced search results

The items of her speech have only one reference in terms of the context of her speech: But transferred to other contexts they become loaded with special meanings. To sum up, all the central symbols of the poem head up here; but here, in the only section in which they are explicitly bound together, the binding is slight and accidental.

The deeper lines of association only emerge in terms of the total context as the poem develops—and this is, of course, exactly the effect which the poet intends.

Unreal City, Under the brown fog of a winter dawn, A crowd flowed over London Bridge, so many, I had not thought death had undone so many.

Sighs, short and infrequent, were exhaled, And each man fixed his eyes before his feet. There I saw one I knew, and stopped him, crying: Will it bloom this year? Here, Eliot uses it in much the same effect: If he is dug up again, then his spirit will never find rest, and he will never be reborn — here, Eliot, capitalizing on the quote, changes it so that the attempt to disturb rebirth is seen as a good thing.

Ed Folsom and Kenneth M. Price, "Walt Whitman" - The Walt Whitman Archive

After all, Eliot is implying, who would want to be reborn in a world without culture? The title is taken from two plays by Thomas Middleton, wherein the idea of a game of chess is an exercise in seduction.

The Chair she sat in, like a burnished throne, Glowed on the marble, where the glass Held up by standards wrought with fruited vines From which a golden Cupidon peeped out Another hid his eyes behind his wing Doubled the flames of sevenbranched candelabra Reflecting light upon the table as The glitter of her jewels rose to meet it, From satin cases poured in rich profusion; In vials of ivory and coloured glass Unstoppered, lurked her strange synthetic perfumes, Unguent, powdered, or liquid—troubled, confused And drowned the sense in odours; stirred by the air That freshened from the window, these ascended In fattening the prolonged candle-flames, Flung their smoke into the laquearia, Stirring the pattern on the coffered ceiling.

Literary analysis of the poem the road not taken by walt whitman

And other withered stumps of time Were told upon the walls; staring forms Leaned out, leaning, hushing the room enclosed. Footsteps shuffled on the stair, Under the firelight, under the brush, her hair Spread out in fiery points Glowed into words, then would be savagely still.

Decadence and pre-war luxury abounds in the first part of this stanza. However, the luxury that is written about seems empty.Although remembered now for his elegantly argued critical essays, Matthew Arnold () began his career as a poet, winning early recognition as a student at the Rugby School where his father, Thomas Arnold, had earned national acclaim as a strict and innovative headmaster.

JSTOR is a digital library of academic journals, books, and primary sources. Developing their distinctive, expressive voices as writers and clear visions as readers, ninth graders explore familiar and unfamiliar realms in literary genres drawn from sources across time and the world.

This course was created by Rebecca Epperly Wire. You can contact her through the Facebook community group with questions. You can say thank you to her with a gift.

Family Origins

Please review the FAQs and contact us if you find a problem. Credits: 1 Recommended: 10th, 11th, 12th (This is typically the 11th grade course.) Prerequisite: Literature. Family Origins. Walt Whitman, arguably America's most influential and innovative poet, was born into a working class family in West Hills on Long Island, on May 31, , just thirty years after George Washington was inaugurated as the first president of the newly formed United States.

Contact About Links: Search results Found matching titles: Homeward Songs by the Way A.E. (George W. Russell)., ; Deborah; a [verse] play Abercrombie (Lascelles).

Browse By Title: L - Project Gutenberg